Shana Silver: YA writer

FOREIGN EXCHANGE Cover Reveal and ISLA AND THE HAPPILY EVER AFTER Giveaway!

FOREIGN EXCHANGE Cover Reveal and ISLA AND THE HAPPILY EVER AFTER Giveaway!

 

Here are a few of Denise’s thoughts on Foreign Exchange and its cover…

I’m so incredibly excited to share my cover of Foreign Exchange with you! This book holds a very special place in my heart. I wrote it during a very difficult year of my life, and the characters and their stories were a real bright spot for me.

Because this book is so important to me, I’m giving away something VERY important to me to go along with this cover reveal. I was fortunate enough to receive an early copy of the highly-anticipated Isla and the Happily Ever After by one of my all-time favorite authors, Stephanie Perkins. ISLA and Foreign Exchange are both romances with swoon-worthy boys, and they’re both set partially in Europe. So I want one lucky person to receive my advanced copy of ISLA in to get you excited for Foreign Exchange!

Read on, check out my cover, and read the first chapter of Foreign Exchange below. It’ll all help you in earning extra entries to win my copy of Isla and the Happily Ever After!

And here is the beautiful cover…

 

Jamie Monroe has always played it safe. That is, until her live-for-the-moment best friend, Tristan, jets off to Italy on a student exchange program. Left alone with her part-time mother and her disabled brother, Jamie discovers that she is quite capable of taking her own risks, starting with her best friend’s hotter-than-hot older brother, Sawyer. Sawyer and Tristan have been neighbors for years, but as Jamie grows closer to the family she thought she knew, she discovers some pretty big secrets.

 

As she sinks deeper into their web of pretense, she suspects that her best friend may not be on a safe exchange program at all. Jamie sets off to Europe on a class trip with plans to meet up with Tristan, but when Tristan stops all communication, suddenly no one seems trustworthy, least of all the one person she was starting to trust—Sawyer. 

 

 “Foreign Exchange is a fresh contemporary YA that will keep readers compulsively turning pages until the very end. Combining international intrigue with a steamy forbidden romance makes for a can’t miss read.”

 - Eileen Cook  Author of Year of Mistaken Discoveries. 

“A pitch perfect voice and delicious chemistry kept me turning those pages!”

- Tara Kelly, author of Amplified and Encore

“Foreign Exchange is heart pounding and suspenseful…the teenage dream of escaping the boredom of suburbia by travelling Europe and spending quality time with a hot guy shifts into a dangerous nightmare.”

 - D.R. Graham, author of Rank and the upcoming Noir et Bleu MC series.

 

One of the entries in the Rafflecopter below will ask you a question from the above chapter!

This contest is open internationally!

Don’t forget…this copy of ISLA could be yours…

 

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

 

* Note – If you cannot access the Rafflecopter Widget through this blog, access it HERE.

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Updates galore!

The last few weeks have been pretty insanely awesome for me, both from a writing-standpoint and a day job standpoint. I’ve tweeted about most of this news, but I haven’t posted it here yet. So, here are some fun newsy updates from me.

 

1. I have a new agent!

A few weeks ago I signed with Jim McCarthy of Dystel and Goderich! I’m super excited to be working with him. I love his revision ideas for my YA sci-fi and I can’t wait to get started on revisions.

The query process ended up being a bit untraditional for me and happened relatively fast (basically about a month from first query to offer). I only sent 5 unsolicited queries (Jim was one of them) though I had roughly 15 full or partial requests from contests (I participated in #PITMAD, #RTSLAP, The Writer’s Voice, and Nest Pitch). I ended up with two offers of rep from two awesome agents (and all of this happened while at BEA!). Yay for a new agent!

 

2. I’m going to be a Pitch Wars mentor!

I’m ridiculously excited about this and I can’t wait to pay it forward since I had such a great time entering contests last month. More info about this in the next few weeks.

 

3.Day job funtimes!

I got a promotion at work! I’m now officially a Project Manager instead of an Associate Project Manager. Woohoo!

 

Woohoo! June has been very kind to me so far!

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Tips for Surviving (and enjoying) BEA: 2014 edition

This post was one of my most popular last year, and with BEA upon us again next week, I thought I’d repost it. But with some new additions! The additions will be written in blue.

For a first time attendee, BEA (Book Expo America) can be overwhelming. This will be my sixth year attending the conference and over the past few years, I’ve developed a list of tips for surviving and enjoying BEA. (Please note I’m attending via my day job, so I’ll be wearing my professional Digital Publisher hat as well as my Book Lover hat.)

1. Make a schedule.

Anyone who has gone with me to BEA in the past knows how much I love schedules. I include every possible thing I want to see–whether it’s an autographing session, a conference session, or a galley giveaway. I also include stuff I’m not interested in myself but I know my friends might be. I always carry extra copies because there’s always someone who never thought to bring a schedule. And yes, I schedule lunch too. (More on that in a bit.)

Print separate schedules for each day to limit what you need to carry. I usually leave the follow days’ schedules in my suitcase.

 

2. Don’t get to the Javits on time.

Get there either really early so you’re first in line (like 7:30/8) or get there late so you miss the line entirely. Arriving on time means you’ll be stuck on a ridiculously long line.

If you’re going with friends, designate someone each morning to be the “place holder.” They arrive early and hold spots for others. Please limit this to only 2-3 people though and make sure you let the people behind you on line know you have others joining you. People may see this as frowned upon, but I guarantee everyone on line is doing it.

 

3. Get coffee before you get to the Javits center.

Avoid the on site Starbucks! The line there is longer than any other autographing line in the entire conference!

I usually eat on my walk to the Javits (from Penn Station) or while waiting in line. Yay for multi-tasking!

 

4. Check a suitcase but carry a backpack plus tote bags.

Schedule in periodic drops to the suitcase to lighten your carrying load. I think checking a suitcase for the day is $3 and overnight is $10. I usually leave the suitcase overnight one night so I don’t have to lug it around to parties since I commute into the city from NJ.

Leave a bottle of water in your suitcase so you don’t have to carry it on the floor. Alternatively, bring an empty bottle of water and fill it up as necessary at the water fountains.

 

5. Eat lunch early or late.

The Javits is expensive (for non-NYC standards. If you’re from NYC, then the food there is reasonably priced!). And crowded. I suggest either eating lunch either at 11am or after 2pm. From 11:30-1:30, you won’t get a seat and you’ll spend an hour on line anyway. Alternatively, bring a power bar or a snack. There’s nothing around the Javits to eat at unless you walk several blocks away (or eat at the gross McDonald’s nearby).

 The shortest line always seems to be the BBQ place, so get in the mood now!

 

6. Be selective.

Don’t take every galley you see just because you can. Don’t be greedy. Take only the ones you know you will read, leave the rest for others. The conference is mainly for librarians and booksellers, not readers (except on BookCon maybe).

Don’t forget the panels and conference sessions either. They are often informative and entertaining and well worth skipping a line to see.

 

7. Get to autographing lines early.

And I mean EARLY. I often lined up an hour before certain authors I knew would have long wait times. I have never seen an autographing line without a long wait. If you want a book, plan in advance for it.

While I suggested saving spots on the opening line above, savings spots in autographing lines is a no no. Don’t do it. Everyone who wants the book needs to wait in line the entire time.

8. Dress to your standard of comfort but look professional.

I’ve seen other BEA tips lists suggest wearing sneakers. I’m not going to suggest that. I’ve never worn sneakers to the convention, even two years ago when I attended at 9-months pregnant. Yes, you will  be standing nearly all day. But that doesn’t mean you have to wear sneakers. Wear cute flats or sandals, something you can stand in all day. I always wear a dress. I never wear jeans.

I find Toms to be the best shoes to wear. They are cute but comfortable and look more professional than sneakers. 

 

9. Carry business cards

They don’t have to be super fancy or graphic designy, but you will want something to hand out to all the people you meet. Otherwise how will they find you? After all, you should be networking. Which brings me to…

 Write your twitter name on your badge so people know how to find you easily!

 

10. Network!

You’re among your kind at BEA: other book lovers! Start a conversation with the people next to you on line. You clearly have the same interests. I’ve made great friends at BEA that I’ve kept in touch with.

But don’t pitch agents or publishers. This is not the time or the place.

 

11. Avoid twitter.

Otherwise you’ll drain your phone battery. Plus, you want to be present at the conference, not with your nose to your phone all day. (We’d all prefer you with your nose to a book you picked up!)

You won’t find outlets at the Javits unless you have access to one of the lounges. I generally bring two phones, my personal one and my work blackberry, and I leave the blackberry turned off so when I need to call my husband to pick me up at the train later, I have a phone that actually works still. 

 

12. Get a Taxi on 10th ave or 9th ave, not in front of the Javits

You will be waiting forever if you try to snag a taxi in front of the Javits, but if you just walk a block or two, you’ll have your pick of taxis.

Except during Taxi turn over time, generally around 4-5pm. The day time taxis are done for the day and the night time taxis don’t start yet. It’s harder to find a taxi during this time. Utilize the free buses the Javits provides. Last year I took one to the Marriott Marquis and then walked only three blocks to Port Authority instead of the bazillion blocks it would have been.

 

13. Don’t be afraid of the subway

Seriously, it won’t bite. It’s not that complicated to navigate with since most trains run straight up and down. Trust me, I take the subway every day to work and I’m still in one piece!

 But the subway won’t help you if you need to go across town.

 

14. Enjoy the people as well as the books

My fave part of BEA is hanging out with my writing/book-loving friends who I don’t get to see the rest of the year. I always come back exhilarated about writing and reading thanks to our conversations and the general atmosphere of being in a place where everyone loves and appreciates books. Remember to have fun.

15. End the weekend with a pedicure.

Your feet will hurt. Treat yo’self!

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REVERSE: Writer’s Voice Entry

QUERY:

REVERSE is an 80k YA Sci-fi in the vein of BIG BANG THEORY meets BENJAMIN BUTTON.

Normal after school jobs are overrated, so seventeen-year-old Arden Varga steals her classmates’ memories and sells them to other students. Who wouldn’t pay top dollar for a night as the homecoming queen? Arden’s making serious bank until someone from her school for science geniuses hacks her mind-uploading app and erases her memories’ greatest hits. Vivid flashbacks rip her out of the present and dump her into past mistakes she never wanted to relive. Those forgotten experiences all feature a boy named Sebastian Cuomo, a rival classmate who breaks into school to do homework and makes even quantum physics sound sexy. Unfortunately he can’t remember her either, but the past reveals they’ve been harboring a secret time manipulation project together…and a secret relationship.

As they team up to investigate how to stop the disruptive flashbacks, who carved out their minds, and what they mean to each other, the hacker uses their secret app to make time itself go backward. With the clock counting in the wrong direction and time keeping Arden in the past longer and longer, she must find the culprit before she’s trapped forever living life in reverse.

My work has finaled in the RWA “Get Your Stiletto In The Door” contest and the RWA North Texas’s “Great Expectations” contest. My short stories have appeared in various literary magazines such as ShatterColors Literary Review and The Hiss Quarterly. I studied creative writing at Syracuse University under Junot Diaz and Mary Gaitskill, and I now work at a well-known educational publisher in NYC where I oversee the creation of tablet apps, eBooks, and other digital products.

First 250 Words:

The problem with stealing other people’s memories is you start to lose the difference between what’s theirs and what’s yours. Luckily, I know how to exploit that—as long as the teachers don’t find out, anyway. Normal after-school jobs are overrated when you have a secret during-school-business.

I flip through a list of cataloged memory files on my mind-uploading app as a line of students snakes away from me, each one wanting to buy a different experience. Charlotte Marion, my partner in crime, doles out numbers as if the students are waiting in line at the deli. Once they receive a number, they disperse across the courtyard and mill about like strangers trying to act normal before they break out in a Flash Mob.

“I need the answers to the Organic Chem homework.” The first customer out of thirty lifts a tablet, revealing a mess of stylus-created scribbles on top of complicated math problems.

Charlotte holds out her palm, indicating ten bucks. The girl shifts her weight from foot to foot, skirt swishing around bare legs. Dark clouds swirl in the washed out sky, turning the mirrored building in front of us into a sheet of gray. Cold and clinical, more like an office building than a high school for science geniuses.

Charlotte nudges my shoulder until my lips pop open. “Number two!” I yell, tapping my stiletto on the concrete path.

The customer hands me the cash, and I get to work selling the girl someone else’s stolen memory.

 

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March Madness Day 26 Check-in

Today is my sister’s wedding anniversary (and by typing this, hopefully I will actually remember to wish her a happy anniversary today) but it’s also Day 26 check-in!

I’d like to give away another prize from our huge prize arsenal today! Today’s winner is…

Daniel R. Davis!

Congratulations! Stop by our goal-setting post, and choose your prize from those still listed. Email Denise at d(at)denisejaden(dot)com with your choice and we’ll get it out to you as soon as possible.

And if you didn’t win, there are still LOTS of great prizes to be won, so keep checking in each day…

 

We’re in the final stretch, folks! Only a few days left to meet those goals. In keeping with the “S” theme, today’s topic is success. Specifically, success when you aren’t successful.

For those of you who reached your goals, you are awesome! And those of you who didn’t, you are also awesome! Because March Madness success does not necessarily mean completing what you set out to do. Every word you write toward your goal is progress and that progress is an achievement. I don’t know about you, but I count any achievements as a form of success. Without those, I’d have less words and more importantly, I’d be further from completing my goal than I am now.

Because, WIPsters, I will not complete my goal this month. I realize now it was too lofty to try to do an entire book overhaul in 31 days. I am likely going to end up 2/3 of the way done, which is great! I’m proud of that progress. Halfway through this month I realized I was going in the wrong direction and I had to backtrack a few chapters, so even though I dumped a lot of words and a lot of time, I needed to write those wrong ones to find the right ones.

So maybe, like me, you reached to far with your goals. Or life got in the way. Or you changed your mind or your heart. That’s okay. Because you still started your goal, which is just as important as finishing it.

How do you measure success if you are not successful at your original goal? Do you change your self-imposed deadline date once March is over or keep going as you are now?

And, of course, how did you do this week? I can’t wait to hear your progress!

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March Madness: Check-in Day 19!

Hello WIPsters! I can’t wait to hear about your progress this week. But first, I’d like to give away another prize from our huge prize arsenal today! Today’s winner is…

Candilynn Fite!

Congratulations, Jennifer! Stop by our goal-setting post, and choose your prize from those still listed. Email Denise at d(at)denisejaden(dot)com with your choice and we’ll get it out to you as soon as possible.

And if you didn’t win, there are still LOTS of great prizes to be won, so keep checking in each day…

Two weeks ago I discussed scheduling. Last week setbacks. Continuing with the “S” theme, today’s topic is SPRINTS. As in writing sprints.

Dear WIPsters, these are my savior. They encourage me to write when I’m too busy, too tired, too excited by a fun twitter conversation. They force me to focus. They hold me accountable.

So what are they exactly?

15 minute intervals of focused writing. No Internet. No television. No day job work. Strap that child in a high chair and ignore her. (Okay, maybe not that last one.) I user timeanddate.com/timer to set a 15 minute countdown clock.

But what fun would a sprint be without people to hold you accountable? The key for me is that two of my critique partners, Chandler Baker and Jen Hayley, are on gChat all day with one. Throughout the day, one of us will initiate a sprint. If it wasn’t me who initiated, then often it pushes me to get a bit of writing in when I otherwise wasn’t planning to. Plus we hold each other accountable by reporting our progress after each sprint.

I tend to be more productive in each 15-minute sprint than I am during a solid two hour block of writing. Therefore, if you’re having trouble making progress, I suggest you split up your writing into small increments throughout the day and see how it helps.

Do you write in large chunks or small chunks? Once per day or throughout? And how is everyone doing on your progress?

I finally made it past the chunk of chapters I was stuck on for a while and the next few chapters should be smooth sailing. Yay!

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March Madness Day 12 check-in

march_mad

Hello lovely WIPsters! We’re not quite halfway there yet but almost. Last week I discussed using a revision schedule to break up your larger goal into bite-sized milestones. Did anyone try this method? If so, how did it go for you?

One thing I wanted to discuss today is setbacks. A setback can be of the time suck kind: your kid getting sick and needing attention when you normally write, unforeseen overtime at work, changed plans. Or it can be of the writing kind: realizing several chapters you just revised aren’t working and you need to rework them all over again with a new plot line, getting stuck on some aspect of your book like where to place a certain scene and trying it in several places results in a domino effect of changes, writing yourself into a corner, etc.

Almost all of the above happened to me last week. So I’m literally working on the same chapters I was last week but now they are newer chapters since I had to change the entire plot/setting/etc that happened in them. In my case, I was clinging too hard to the original straight contemporary of this version because I liked a particular sequence of events. But last Friday I had a lightbulb moment where I realized keeping that sequence made no sense in context anymore. It had to go but since I’d weaved the new plot around it, I had to unweave it all and put it back together again. In a different order this time.

So my schedule is blown but that’s okay. Because progress is progress!

But I’m curious. How do you handle a major change to your draft in the middle of drafting? Do you go back and fix it right away? Or do you make a note of what needs to change and tackle it in the next pass? Or another method entirely?

Sound off in the comments! And don’t forget to check in about your progress.

Head to Denise’s blog tomorrow for Thursday’s check-in!

 

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March Madness Day 5 Check-in

Hello fellow March Madness-ers!

How are you doing on your goals? So far I’ve been super productive and I’ve hit my tasks exactly as scheduled. “Scheduled?” you ask. Well, more on that in a moment. But first I’d like to give away another prize from our huge prize arsenal today!

 

Today’s winner is…

Deana J. Holmes!

Congratulations, DeanaStop by our goal-setting post, and choose your prize from those still listed. Email Denise at d(at)denisejaden(dot)com with your choice and we’ll get it out to you as soon as possible.

 

And if you didn’t win, there are still LOTS of great prizes to be won, so keep checking in each day…

Now, I’d like to talk about goal setting. Specifically, setting small bite-sized goals that are not only realistic but achievable. In my day job as a Project Manager (in digital publishing), one of my main tasks is to create milestone schedules that break down large projects into smaller “deliverables.” This way, each person working on the project knows what they need to get done in a particular week. I usually divide projects into batches that each have their own due date, so if a smaller task falls behind, it’s okay as long as the batch due date remains the same.

I’ve started to apply this same scheduling philosophy to my writing and revisions and since then my productivity has greatly improved. This is an example of a schedule I’ve created to help me track revision tasks. This is a blank version:

Chapter # Task Name Type of Revision Duration Due Date
Batch 1 (Chapters #-#)
Due Date 03/##/14

Here is an example of how I’m using the schedule for my revision. I’ve made it generic so as to remove any details about the book, but basically I am turning a straight Contemporary novel into Magical Realism and adding a mystery element with clues and a search.

Chapter # Task Name Type of Revision Duration Due Date
Batch 1 (Chapters 1-5)
 1  Add in info about what Protagonist wants  Line edits  1 day  3/1/2014
 1  Add: Antagonist gives Protagonist a key  Line edits  1 day  3/1/2014
 2  Delete scene with brother  Delete scene  1 day  3/1/2014
 2  Protagonist finds the first clue  New Chapter  2 days  3/3/2014
 3  Remove info relating to Old Subplot  Line edits  1 day  3/4/2014
 4 After Protagonist gets to class, add in brief scene where she searches for Antagonist online. Love Interest catches her  Addition to scene 1 day 3/5/2014
 4 Reset location of date with Love Interest  Line edits 1 day 3/5/2014
 5 Protagonist and Love Interest find second clue.  New Chapter 2 days 3/7/2014
Due Date 03/07/14

I’m proud to say I’ve actually ahead of schedule at the moment. I’ve already completed all tasks for Batch 1, which gives me more buffer room in Batch 2.

And good news, March Madness-ers! I’m putting up a blank Excel version of this schedule (with an example tab) for you to download and use yourself!

The Excel version looks a little different:

schedule

It includes additional tabs to log new issues that need to be fixed in a 2nd revision pass. For example, in chapter 5 I realized I needed to change the timeline from a Wednesday night to a Friday night, so I wrote down “Fix timeline consistency in chapters 1-4″ to tackle in pass 2 so I can keep forward momentum of the revisions without constantly backtracking.

You can download the Revision_Schedule HERE!

Now how did you do today?

And don’t forget to stop by Denise’s blog for Thursday’s check in: http://denisejaden.blogspot.com

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FAST FICTION by Denise Jaden

My longtime friend and critique partner Denise Jaden has a new book coming out. I will share my awesome review of it in a few days, but for now, hear about it in her own words:

 

Rather than doing a traditional interview-filled blog tour, Denise Jaden is celebrating the release of her new nonfiction writing book, FAST FICTION, by dropping tips about writing quickly at every stop of her blog tour, and offering some awesome prizes for commenting on any of these posts (including this one!)

The more you drop by and comment, the more chances you have to win these great prizes:

Denise’s Fast Fiction Tip: Keep All Ideas Together

One of my biggest fast fiction tips is to brainstorm, brainstorm,

brainstorm, because the more ideas you have to work with, the less you’ll get

stuck when it comes time to drafting your stories. My second biggest tip is to

keep all of these ideas in one place. I’ve always been a fairly active

brainstormer, but I admit, up until the last couple of years, I wasn’t very

organized about it. I’d have notes on characters in every notebook in my house.

Sticky notes littered not just my desk, but my kitchen table and nightstand.

The thing is, it only took me a few minutes to sit down and plan a strategy to

change this and put it into place. For me, this came in the form of an iPhone

app (A Novel Idea). It’s an easy

place to jot down all of my character, setting and plotting notes, all

separated into the novels I think they’ll work for. I always have my phone with

me, so whether an idea hits me at the grocery store, or when I’m dropping my

son off at judo, it’s now super-easy for me to make sure it gets recorded where

I’ll find it again right when I need it.

Your solution may not be an iPhone app, of course. But I

encourage you to take just a few minutes and decide what a smart strategy would

be for you. A thick notebook that will never run out? A voice recorder? Or a whole

file cabinet, containing a file for every novel, character, and plot detail?

It’s up to you, but organization is a fast-drafter’s best friend!

 

 

The Prizes:

  • Compliments of New World Library: They will be giving away A BOX of copies of FAST FICTION by Denise Jaden and GET IT DONE by Sam Bennett (US and Canada only):
  • Compliments of Denise Jaden, TWO BOXES of great fiction (US Only). Details on Denise’s blog.
  • Audiobook copies of NEVER ENOUGH by Denise Jaden!
  • A critique of your first five pages, compliments of Denise’s agent, Michelle Humphrey from The Martha Kaplan Agency!

All you have to do is enter the rafflecopter for a chance to win (at the bottom of this post, I’ve included links to all of the other blogs where you can comment for more chances to win).

About Fast Fiction:

Writers flock to National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) each November because it provides a procrastination-busting deadline. But only a fraction of the participants meet their goal. Denise Jaden was part of that fraction, writing first drafts of her two published young adult novels during NaNoWriMo. In Fast Fiction, she shows other writers how to do what she did, step-by-step, writer to writer. Her process starts with a prep period for thinking through plot, theme, characters, and setting. Then Jaden provides day-by-day coaching for the thirty-day drafting period. Finally, her revision tips help writers turn merely workable drafts into compelling and publishable novels.

 

A portion of publisher proceeds will be donated to National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo)

 

Praise for Fast Fiction:

 

“Fast Fiction is filled with stellar advice, solid-gold tips, and doable, practical exercises for all writers who want to draft a complete novel.”

— Melissa Walker, author of Violet on the Runway

“Being a ‘pantser’ I have always resisted outlining, but I have to say that Fast Fiction changed my mind! Denise Jaden takes what I find to be a scary process (outlining) and makes it into an easy and, dare I say, enjoyable one. Fast Fiction is a hands-on book that asks the right questions to get your mind and your story flowing. I know I’ll be using Fast Fiction over and over again. Highly recommended for fiction writers!

— Janet Gurtler, author of RITA Award finalist I’m Not Her

“Fast Fiction is full of strategies and insights that will inspire and motivate writers of every experience level — and best of all, it provides them with a solid plan to quickly complete the first draft of their next novel.”

— Mindi Scott, author of Freefall

“Fast Fiction provides writers with the perfect mix of practical guidance and the kick in the pants they need to finish that draft. This book is a must-have for writers of all levels.”

— Eileen Cook, author of The Almost Truth

Practical and down-to-earth, Denise Jaden’s Fast Fiction makes a one-month draft seem doable, even for beginners, any month of the year.”

— Jennifer Echols, author of Endless Summer and Playing Dirty

“One of the greatest challenges any writer faces is getting a great idea out of one’s brain and onto the page. Fast Fiction breaks that process down into concrete, manageable steps, each accompanied by Denise Jaden’s sage advice and enthusiastic encouragement. And anything that helps streamline the drafting process is a-okay by me! Fast Fiction is a great addition to any writer’s toolbox — I’ve got it in mine!”

— Catherine Knutsson, author of Shadows Cast by Stars

“Forget the fact that this resource is directed at those wanting to complete a fast draft — if you’re out to get your novel done, period, Jaden’s Fast Fiction will be the kick in the butt that gets you there, from story plan to ‘The End’. . . and beyond.”

— Judith Graves, author of the Skinned series for young adults

Where you can find Fast Fiction:

Blog Tour Stops:

Comment on any of the following blog posts celebrating Fast Fiction’s release to be entered to win prizes galore!

(All Fast Fiction blog posts should be live by March 9th, or sooner. Contest will be open until March 15th. If any links don’t work, stop by http://denisejaden.blogspot.com for updated links.)

GCC Blogs:

Additional Participating Blogs:

Remember, all you have to do is leave comments to get lots of extra entries to win some great prizes.

Don’t know what to comment about? Tell us the name of your favorite writing book!

Share this widget here:

http://www.rafflecopter.com/rafl/share-code/Y2QyYmEwOTMzNTUyNGRiYWY0NWE1YWE4YjBjN2I2OjQ=/

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

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March Madness is coming!

Get your typing fingers ready, writers. It’s that time of year again. Time for March Madness! No, not the boring basketball kind (okay, I actually do kind of like the basketball kind). The writing motivation kind!

march_mad

March Madness is an annual challenge started by Denise Jaden for writers, readers, bloggers, or anyone who has a goal they want to achieve. Set a goal and we’ll hold you accountable for it! It’s a great motivational tool because the daily check ins offer a way to keep yourself on track while also helping you win fabulous prizes!

So think about what goal you want to challenge yourself with during the month of March. Off-peak NaNo-style first draft? Tackle that massive revision to-do list? Write and pre-schedule a bunch of blogs? Finally read behemoths like The Goldfinch or Infinite Jest?

I’m plotting (quite literally) a big revision of one of my WIPs that I’d like to complete in March. So big I’m even creating a revision schedule. I’m converting my book from straight-up contemp to magical realism, which basically requires an all new Act 1 (amongst other big changes). So let’s make a deal, blog readers. You hold me accountable and I’ll hold you accountable!

Here is the #MarchMadness blog schedule. Don’t forget to check in on Carol’s blog on Saturday March 1st to announce your goals!

Mondays –  Laura – http://lstaylor.blogspot.com

Tuesdays – Shari – http://www.sharigreen.com

Wednesdays – Shana – http://www.shana-silver.com

Thursdays – Denise – http://denisejaden.blogspot.com

Fridays –  Tonette – http://www.tonettedelaluna.com

Saturdays – Carol - http://careann.wordpress.com

Sundays – Angelina – http://yascribe.blogspot.ca

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